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Check Stamped

This type was defined at Fort King George at Darien, Georgia by Sheila Kelly Caldwell in the 1950s. Named after the Altamaha River and based upon King George Check Stamped with the blessings of her husband, archaeologist Joseph Caldwell, who dug at the site in the late 1930s and who named the King George series. Sheila Caldwell also toyed with the name Pine Harbor Check Stamped for this material.

Defined by Sears at Kolomoki, and he was perhaps the only person to use this name. Most people considered it Deptford Check Stamped, and by the 1960s, the name was no longer used at all. This name might make some sense in a type-variety system to speak of the Kolomoki variant of Deptford as Blakely, but we don't know if it can be separately identified. Named after the town of Blakely, Georgia.

Defined by Joseph Caldwell after work at the Booger Bottom site in the Buford Reservoir (Lake Lanier) of northern Georgia. Presumably a local variety of Cartersville Check Stamped with little to recommend it. Probably should not be used again.

Defined by Joseph Caldwell in the Buford Reservoir (Lake Lanier) in northern Georgia. Named after the Booger Bottom site. Presumably a local variety of Cartersville Linear Check Stamped with little to recommend it. Probably should not be used again.

Named by Joseph Caldwell based upon work in the Allatoona Reservoir. Historic Cherokee pottery style.

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This type was defined by Joseph Caldwell based upon his excavations in the Allatoona Reservoir. It is the equivalent of Deptford Check Stamped from northwestern Georgia, and it has become the standard type name for all of northern Georgia and even inland Georgia for Middle Woodland check stamped pottery. In general the northern Georgia Cartersville pottery is a little thinner and sandier than similar pottery from the Deptford site on the Georgia coast. Named after Cartersville, Georgia.

This type was defined by Joseph Caldwell based upon his excavation in the Allatoona Reservoir. It is the equivalent of Deptford Linear Check Stamped, and has become the standard type for all of northern Georgia and even inland Georgia for the Middle Woodland linear check stamped pottery. In general the northern Georgia Cartersville pottery is a little thinner and sandier than similar pottery from the Deptford site and southern Georgia. Named after Cartersville, Georgia.

The Connestee series was named by Bennie Keel from excavations in western North Carolina, particularly the Tuckasegee site. This material is almost identical to Middle Woodland material from northern Georgia. This type, for example, is the same as Cartersville Check Stamped. We believe that these names are better avoided in Georgia, but might be used near the North Carolina border. Named after Connestee Falls?

Named after the town Decatur in Meigs County, Tennessee. Not sure if this name is relevant in Georgia, but probably not.

Joseph Caldwell and Antonio Waring named this type base upon the 1930's WPA work at the Deptford site, 9Ch2,in Chatham County on the Georgia Coast. Deptford Bold Check Stamped and Deptford Check Stamped are the same type. By the 1960s Wauchope was using the name Deptford Check Stamped for the non-linear check stamped pottery.

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Joseph Caldwell and Antonio Waring named this type base upon the 1930's WPA work at the Deptford Site, 9Ch2, in Chatham County on the Georgia Coast. Deptford Bold Check Stamped and Deptford Check Stamped are the same type. By the 1960's Wauchope was using the name Deptford Check Stamped for the non-linear check stamped pottery.

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Joseph Caldwell and Antonio Waring named this type based upon work at the Deptford site, 9Ch2, in Chatham County.

This type was named by Joseph Caldwell for material from the Allatoona Reservoir. Named after old Galt's Ferry over the Etowah River in Cherokee County. It is associated with late Cherokee Indian occupation of northwestern Georgia.

Named by Gordon Willey in 1949. We do not think anyone has used this type in Georgia. The guess is that it is the same as Deptford Check Stamped, although a bit more recent. Presumably this would have been an ancestor to Wakulla Check Stamped. Named after Gulf County, Florida. Name was supposedly discarded by the Southeastern Archaeological Conference in 1951 or 1953 according to Bullen (1966:11).

Named after the Irene site, 9Ch1, in the northern portion of Savannah excavated in the late 1930s. Never formally defined, but recognized and discussed by Caldwell in his 1969 class. Related to the Lamar series.

Named by Joseph Caldwell in his master's thesis after WPA excavations at Fort King George at Darien in McIntosh County near the mouth of the Altamaha River. Joseph Caldwell and his wife, Sheila Kelly Caldwell, eventually renamed this type as Altamaha Check Stamped presumably because this was an Indian pottery that definitely preceded the constructions of the Fort. This term should probably not be used.

The type was named for the small community of Ladds and the mountain that seemed to be associated with the Leake site.

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Hale Smith named this type after Leon County, Florida in 1948 as part of his Leon-Jefferson Complex in northwestern Florida. This type is associated with the historic Apalachee Indians of the Mission period.

A name listed by Broyles that we have been unable to verify that anyone actually ever used. See McLeod Check Stamped.

This type is the same as Deptford Check Stamped. Named by Steve Wimberly after the McLeod Estate site in Clarke County, Alabama. This type was included on the Georgia list by Caldwell in 1969 for unknown reasons.

This type is the same as Deptford Linear Check Stamped. Named by Steve Wimberly after the McLeod Estate site in Clarke County, Alabama. This type was included on the Georgia list by Caldwell in 1969 for unknown reasons.

This type is the same as Deptford Linear Check Stamped. Named by Steve Wimberly after the McLeod Estate site in Clarke County, Alabama. This type was included on the Georgia list by Caldwell in 1969 for unknown reasons.

Charles Fairbanks accidentally named this type without the word "Fields" in 1956. See Ocmulgee Fields Check Stamped, the current recommended name.

Charles Fairbanks defined this type at Ocmulgee National Monument. This type is assumed to be the equivalent of Leon Check Stamped. This type was defined in conjunction with the discovery of the Trading Post at Ocmulgee. It was later discovered that this type is originally from Alabama and that people who were making this came over to the Macon area. This type was originally defined as Ocmulgee Check Stamped in Griffin 1953 by Charles Fairbanks. Joseph Caldwell redefined this with the word "Fields" included for consistency, and this is the recommended form.

This is an early variety of Deptford Check Stamped according to Chester DePratter. Named after the Oemler site in Chatham County.

This type is similar to Boyd Check Stamped and Galt Check Stamped. Named after the Overhill Cherokee of the 18th century by Tom Lewis and Madeline Kneberg.

David Chase defined this type from his work at the Miner's Creek site in DeKalb County. This is an enigmatic and elusive type found at only a handful of Middle Woodland sites, either big Hopewellian centers (including Ohio, Tennessee, Indiana, Georgia, and Florida) as well as at a group of Swift Creek sites in the Atlanta area.

Named by Patricia Holden and revised by Bennie Keel, all from work in western North Carolina. This series has an iridescent sheen, and larger tetrapods than the similar, and presumably later, Connestee series. Presumably named after the Pigeon River. Probably not a name that is very useful for Georgia.

A name used briefly by Sheila Caldwell for what eventually became Altamaha Check Stamped.

Defined by Patricia Holden and later revised by Roy Dickens from excavation in western North Carolina. Probably not a type of much use in Georgia. Presumably named after Pisgah Mountain.

The Qualla series was named by Brian Egloff based upon excavations by a number of people in western North Carolina, as well as northwestern South Carolina. This material is essentially Lamar series material, and that term is recommended for use in Georgia. Named after the Qualla Cherokee Reservation.

This time was originally defined by Hale Smith. Named for Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine, Florida.

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Named for the Savannah River and the city of Savannah by Joseph Caldwell and Antonio Waring.

Named for the Hollywood site in Richmond County just south of Augusta by Carl Miller. Not a recommended name. Uncertain what is intended by the variety designation.

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The defining factor in the St. Johns series is the temper. The temper in this type is diatomaceous earth. The diatomaceous earth occurs along the St. Johns River and is in the clay naturally.

Originally named the Early series by Patricia Holden, this was renamed as the Swannanoa series by Keel. This is the earliest Woodland pottery series of western North Carolina. Named after the Swannanoa River. Probably is not a good name for use in Georgia.

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This type was originally defined by Gordon Willey for the Florida Gulf Coast area. Named presumably for Wakulla County, Florida.

This type was only made for a brief period in time possibly only 100 years. Named by Chester DePratter after the Walthour site in Chatham County.

This type was originally defined in the Wheeler Basin on the Tennessee River in north-central Alabama based upon WPA excavations there in the 1930s. The fiber-tempered pottery of this area has traditionally been looked at as later than that occurring in the Savannah River basin and Florida.

This was named by Frankie Snow in south-central Georgia for material that was "semi-fiber-tempered"- that is, fiber-tempered with the addition of sand. This may represent a transition series from fiber-tempered to sand-tempered pottery. Named after the Willacoochee River, this is part of what Snow called the Satilla series.

Named after Wilmington Island on the northern Georgia Coast by Joseph Caldwell.

Defined by Wesley Hurt from his work in east-central Alabama as part of the Walter F. George Reservoir survey. Perhaps related to Wakulla Check Stamped. Named for Wilson Creek in Houston County, Alabama.

Named after the town of Woodstock by Robert Wauchope for site 9Ck2 according to Joseph Caldwell in his Allatoona report.

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Defined in northern Alabama from TVA work by William Haag. Named after the town of Wright, Alabama, in Lauderdale County.