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Plain

Defined by Wesley Hurt from his work in east-central Alabama as part of the Walter F. George Reservoir survey. Named after the Abercrombie Mound site.

Defined by Carl Miller at the Guess site (9CO82) as part of his 1949 Allatoona Reservoir Survey. This type was never actually published, has not been used by any other person, and is not recommended for use at all. Named after the town of Acworth. Possible prototype of the Deptford Series. Said to be associated with Mossy Oak Simple Stamped and Dunlap Fabric Marked.

Named by John Goggin after Alachua County, Florida, where Gainesville is located. Worth includes this as part of his Suwannee Valley series.

Sheila Caldwell apparently intended to split this into two types for a gritty plain and a temperless plain in her unpublished data on her excavations at Fort King George. She initially toyed with the names, Creighton Island Plain and Belleville Plain. See King George Plain.

Named by Frank Schnell, Jim Knight, and Gail Schnell after their work at the Cemochechobee site in Clay County. Special ceremonial vessels from the mound at the site. Beaker shape is the primary defining characteristic.

Defined by David Chase. Named after the Averett site.

An early name considered by Sheila Caldwell for what eventually became Altamaha Plain.

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Associated with the Macon Plateau site (9Bi1) at Macon, Georgia, and was defined in the 1930s as part of the massive WPA excavations there. One of several plain pottery types associated with the Macon Plateau period. Named after Bibb County.

Name used by Antonio Waring for plain fiber tempered pottery in Chatham County on the northern Georgia Coast. Named after the Bilbo site in Chatham County. This material is the same as Stallings Plain material and St. Simons Plain. Stephen Williams gives a good description of the confusion / politics associated with this triple naming in the Waring Volume (Williams 1967:103-105).

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Useless name created by Charles Fairbanks in the mid 1950s for certain Macon Plateau period sherds found at the Brown's Mount site, 9Bi5, east of Macon. Brown's Mount Plain is essentially Bibb Plain in the form of little owl effigies that are perched on the lips of Bibb Plain bowls. The excavators found several of these bowls at the Brown's Mount site in a pure Macon Plateau context in the 1930s and Fairbanks thought they were noteworthy enough that he should call them Brown's Mount to recognize this characteristic. Has little reason to exist in our judgment. Use Bibb Plain as a type name instead.

David Chase named this type. Not sure what it is named for.

Named after Chestua Creek in Monroe county, Tennessee. It supposedly is a historic Cherokee ware according to the Bettye Broyles note in 1967. We certainly do not recommend its use in Georgia at the present time.

Defined by David DeJarnette at the Childersburg site in east-central Alabama.

See Walnut Roughened. This type was never used by anyone after its first mention by Arthur Kelly in 1938, although Carol Mason says that a clay wash filming was present on 11 percent of the Walnut Roughened sherds. We are uncertain what this treatment refers to in terms of ceramic technology. Do not use this term.

Defined by Wesley Hurt from his work in east-central Alabama as part of the Walter F. George Reservoir survey. Named after the town of Columbia, Alabama in Houston County. Used as a general category for most plain potteries found in the region. Not recommended.

The Connestee series was named by Bennie Keel from excavations in western North Carolina, particularly the Tuckasegee site. This material is almost identical to Middle Woodland material from northern Georgia. We believe that these names are better avoided in Georgia, but might be used near the North Carolina border. Named after Connestee Falls?

This was defined by Wesley Hurt as part of his work in the Walter F. George Reservoir. The publication of the type description is flawed by printing (page 70 in the publication) so that the data are mixed with the description of Seale Plain. This type is not recommended for use. Presumably named after Coweta County or Coweta Creek.

A name used for a time by Sheila Caldwell before she adopted the name Altamaha Plain. Named after Creighton Island.

This is named for the old town of Dallas, Tennessee, now at the bottom of Chickamauga Lake.

Original name was Franklin Plain (named after Franklin County, Florida) by Gordon Willey for Florida. Waring and Caldwell never defined the plain pottery from the Deptford site in the late 1930s. This was defined later by implication for Middle Woodland plain pottery. The term Cartersville is used for similar plain pottery in northern Georgia.

Named by Gordon Willey for material from the Englewood Mound, 8So1, in Sarasota County, Florida. In Bullen (1967) the type is said to be "not a useful type, should be discarded". No one to our knowledge has used this name in Georgia, but it may occur in extreme southern Georgia. It probably is a type that can be ignored and is listed here simply for completeness.

Named after the Etowah site or valley by William Sears.

Named after the Etowah site by Robert Wauchope.

Named after the Etowah site by Robert Wauchope.

This was named by Joseph Caldwell based upon his excavation in the Allatoona Reservoir. This plain pottery was a part of the historic Cherokee component from northwestern Georgia.

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One of the plain pottery types found at Macon in the 1930s. Named for the head of one of the early trading posts in that area by Jesse Jennings and Charles Fairbanks.

This type is part of the Hamilton series named by Tom Lewis and Madeline Kneberg. This was named after Hamilton County, Tennessee.

A name used by Joseph Caldwell in 1969 for what he soon renamed St. Catherine's Plain. Named after the Haven Home site excavated by Antonio Waring.

Named by Frank Schnell, Jim Knight, and Gail Schnell for Lamar Plain pottery from the Cemochechobee site (9Cy62) in Clay County on the lower Chattahoochee River. This is defined mainly by the lip treatment.

Named after the Irene site, 9Ch1, in the northern portion of Savannah excavated in the late 1930s. Related to Lamar Plain.

Named after the Irene site, 9Ch1, in the northern portion of Savannah excavated in the late 1930s.

Named by Lewis and Kneberg after an old name for the Tennessee River.

The Kelvin series was defined by Fred Cook for late Swift Creek ceramics on the central to lower Georgia Coast. He considered this material sufficiently unique to warrant a separate series designation. The material was named after the Kelvin Grove subdivision site on St. Simons Island.

Named by Joseph Caldwell in his master's thesis after WPA excavations at Fort King George at Darien in McIntosh County near the mouth of the Altamaha River. Joseph Caldwell and his wife, Sheila Kelly Caldwell, eventually renamed this type as Altamaha Plain presumably because this was an Indian pottery that definitely preceded the constructions of the Fort. This term should probably not be used.

This type is based upon William Sears' excavations at the Kolomoki site in Early County from 1948-1951. This type is the plain pottery of Swift Creek and the name Swift Creek Plain should be used instead. Named for the Kolomoki Mound site.

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Named for the famous Lake Jackson site in the northern city limits of Tallahassee, Florida.

David Hally defined this from the Potts Tract site (9Mu103) in Murray County in northwestern Georgia.

This type, strangely, was never formally defined, as best we can determine, although Caldwell almost does so in his 1953 description of the Rembert site. Robert Wauchope used the name Lamar Plain Smoothed, presumably the same thing, but almost no one has used it since him.

Robert Wauchope named this type. Named for the Lamar site, 9Bi2. See Lamar Plain.

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This type was defined by Jesse Jennings and Charles Fairbanks in 1940. Named for Macon, Georgia. This is a very odd pottery type, apparently associated with some unique vessel shape and function.

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This type was defined by Jesse Jennings and Charles Fairbanks in 1940 as one of the Macon Plateau plain pottery types. Named after the McDougal Mound at the Macon Plateau site.

Named after an island flooded under the waters of the Guntersville Reservoir in northeastern Alabama.

Named by Steve Wimberly after the McLeod Estate site in Clarke County, Alabama. This type was included on the Georgia list by Caldwell in 1969 for unknown reasons.

Named by Hale Smith from excavations on historic Apalachee Indian sites in the Tallahassee, Florida area. Name after the Scott Miller site.

This type was originally defined by David Phelps. Perhaps related to the Wheeler Plain series of northern Alabama. Name origin is uncertain.

Defined by Frank Schnell, Jim Knight, and Gail Schnell based upon their work at the Cemochechobee site in Clay County. This pottery is defined by its fine paste and distinctive color.

This is the plain pottery associated with the other Ocmulgee Fields types. Named by Charles Fairbanks.

Named by Robert Wauchope for material upstream from Macon. No one else has really used this type and it is not recommended.

Named after Orange County, Florida, by James B. Griffin.

Named by Patricia Holden and revised by Bennie Keel, all from work in western North Carolina. This series has an iridescent sheen, and larger tetrapods than the similar, presumably later, Connestee series. Presumably named after the Pigeon River. Probably not a name that is very useful for Georgia.

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Named by Gordon Willey for Pinellas County, Florida.

Defined by Patricia Holden and later revised by Roy Dickens from excavation in western North Carolina. Probably not a type that is of much use in Georgia. Presumably named after Pisgah Mountain.

The Qualla series was named by Brian Egloff based upon excavations by a number of people in western North Carolina, as well as northwestern South Carolina. This material is essentially Lamar series material, and that term is recommended for use in Georgia. Named after the Qualla Cherokee Reservation.

The Qualla series was named by Brian Egloff based upon excavations by a number of people in western North Carolina, as well as northern South Carolina. This material is essentially Lamar series material, and that term is recommended for use in Georgia. Named after the Qualla Cherokee Reservation.

Named for the Refuge site north of Savannah, on the Savannah River, which was excavated by Antonio Waring.

This type was originally defined by John Goggin. Named for Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine, Florida.

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This was named by Frankie Snow in south-central Georgia for material that was a semi-fiber tempered that is, fiber tempered with the addition of sand. This may represent a transition series from fiber tempered to sand-tempered pottery. Named after the Satilla River, this is part of what Snow called the Satilla series. See Willacoochee Check Stamped also.

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Named for the Savannah River and the city of Savannah by Joseph Caldwell and Antonio Waring.

Plain pottery at the Irene site associated with the Savannah period. Named for the Savannah River. Not the burnished plain.

Defined by Wesley Hurt from his work in east-central Alabama as part of the Walter F. George Reservoir survey. Perhaps related to Wakulla Check Stamped. Named for Seale, Alabama.

This type was originally defined by William Sears in the Wilbanks site report in 1958. The Wilbanks site was in the Allatoona Reservoir. Named after the little town of Sixes in Cherokee County, Georgia.

Named after St. Catherines Island. Originally recognized by Joseph Caldwell in the late 1960s.

Named after St. Catherines Island. Originally recognized by Joseph Caldwell in the late 1960s. Called Haven Home Plain for a short while.

The defining factor in St. Johns series is the temper. The temper in this type is diatomaceous earth that occurs along the St. Johns River and in the clay naturally.

This is plain fiber-tempered pottery from the lower Georgia Coast. The name Stallings has come to be more used for fiber-tempered pottery everywhere in Georgia, except perhaps the Georgia Coast.

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Defined by James B. Griffin in the 1940s. Known for a long time from the Stallings Island site above Augusta in the Savannah River from the 1920s excavations by the Cosgroves, and by the 1931 report of these excavations by William Claflin. Antonio Waring used the name Stallings Island Plain, but the type name without the word Island is the preferred one at the present.

Originally named the Early series by Patricia Holden, this was renamed as the Swannanoa series by Keel. This is the earliest Woodland pottery series of western North Carolina. Named after the Swannanoa River. Probably is not a good name for use in Georgia.

Plain pottery found in Swift Creek context by Arthur Kelly at the Swift Creek site (9Bi3).

This type is part of the Thom's Creek series from west-central South Carolina. This type is discussed extensively in the Groton Plantation Report by Jim Stoltman. Many have suggested that this type is a transitional type between fiber and sand-tempered pottery types. Related to Refuge Plain, which is a better name to use in Georgia.

Named after Upatoi Creek at Fort Benning near Columbus by David Chase

Presumably named by Tom Lewis and Madeline Kneberg after Watts Bar, Tennessee, in Roane County.

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This type was originally defined by Gordon Willey for the Florida Gulf Coast. Named after the Weeden Island site, 8Pi1, in Pinellas County, Florida.

This type was originally defined in the Wheeler Basin on the Tennessee River in north-central Alabama based upon WPA excavations there in the 1930s. The fiber-tempered pottery of this area has traditionally been looked at as later than that occurring in the Savannah River basin and Florida.

Named after the Wilbanks site, 9Ck5, in Cherokee County by William Sears based upon his excavations there prior to the creation of Lake Allatoona.

Named by Joseph Caldwell based upon his excavations in the Allatoona Reservoir.

Dave Chase used this name for plain pottery found at the Walker Street site south of Columbus.