Back to top

Complicated Stamped

Named after the Altamaha River. The type name was originally called King George Malleated in Joseph Caldwell's Master's thesis, but was changed to the present name by his wife Sheila based upon her excavations at Fort King George in the early 1950s. Once thought to be a series of cross simple stamp designs. We now recognize that Altamaha Cross Simple Stamped and Altamaha Line Blocked are two distinct types.

Swift Creek Complicated Stamped from Chatham County on the Georgia Coast. Named by Caldwell and Waring in the late 1930s. The name Brewton Hill Complicated Stamped has been used only on the Georgia Coast and nowhere else, nor has it been used much since it has been named. See Deptford Complicated Stamped also.

Named after the Clark Hill Reservoir on the Savannah River by Carl Miller.

Named by Carl Miller after the Clark Hill Reservoir on the Savannah River. Not recommended for use now.

Named by Richard Polhemus and James Polhemus, Jr. A very distinctive early Mississippian type in upper eastern Tennessee. Probably a name that should not be used in Georgia. Roy Dickens equated it with Pisgah Complicated Stamped.

A name used for a time by Sheila Caldwell before she adopted the name Altamaha Complicated Stamped. Named after Creighton Island.

Image

Named by Gordon Willey in 1949. This seems to be just a single motif within the broad category of Swift Creek Complicated Stamped. It does not seem necessary to name Crooked River as a separate type.

Named by Gordon Willey in 1949. This seems to be just a single motif within the broad category of Swift Creek. He implies that it is later, as part of his Weeden Island period, but the only difference noted from the Early Variety is the coarser paste and finish. Whether this distinction is true of not in Georgia (or Florida) is probably an open question.

Arthur Kelly's original (ca.1935) name for what became known as Napier Complicated Stamped. One of the first pottery types in Georgia, this name is now completely obsolete.

This is Swift Creek Complicated Stamped from the Deptford site. Caldwell used the term in 1952, without much comment or formal description and DePratter continued to use this as a part of the Deptford series in his work. This type is also the same as Brewton Hill Complicated Stamped.

Joseph Caldwell defined this in his Allatoona Reservoir report based upon his excavations there in the late 1940s. This is a specific complicated stamped motif that is quite common during the Etowah period.

Named after the Etowah site (9Br1) by Arthur Kelly and Stu Neitzel based upon their excavations at the Chauga site (38Oc47) in Oconee County, South Carolina.

This is presumably the same as Etowah Complicated Stamped. Uses the name Etowah Complicated Stamped instead.

The Fairchilds Landing site, 9Se14, was a shell midden on the bank of the Chattahoochee River in Seminole County. This site is presently under Lake Seminole. Joseph Caldwell wrote a draft of the report of this site. Betty Smith edited it, but it has never been published to date. It is unknown if anyone has used this type name anywhere except Caldwell at the Fairchilds Landing site. He used the name for a late variety of Swift Creek that he saw there.

This type was named by Joseph Caldwell for material from the Allatoona Reservoir. Named after old Galt's Ferry over the Etowah River in Cherokee County.

Named after the Hares Landing site in Lake Seminole by Joseph Caldwell. Apparently named only in his 1969 ceramics seminar.

Image

Defined by Tom Lewis and Madeline Kneberg at the Hiwassee Island site on Hiwassee Island at the mouth of the Hiwassee River in eastern Tennessee. This pottery is identical to Etowah Complicated Stamped except that it is tempered with finely ground shell rather than sand or grit.

Named after the Ichtucknee River in north-central Florida. Nothing is known about this type except its mention in Broyles (1967).

Named after the Irene site, 9Ch1, in the northern portion of Savannah excavated in the late 1930s. This obvious name was never defined as such in the 1930s, but Chester DePratter formally defined in years later. Related to Lamar Complicated Stamped.

This type was named by Joseph Caldwell and Antonio Waring after the Irene site, 9Ch1, excavated in Savannah in the late 1930s. This type name is no longer recommended, use Irene Complicated Stamped instead.

This name was used briefly by Hale Smith as the name for historic Apalachee Indian complicated stamped pottery. It was named by Hale Smith from his excavations around Tallahassee, Florida. It was named after Jefferson County, Florida.

This unusual type includes several historic Apalachee Indian ceramic types, but primarily is the same as what is now called Leon-Jefferson Complicated Stamped. It was named by Hale Smith from his excavations around Tallahassee, Florida. It was named after Jefferson County, Florida.

The Kelvin series was defined by Fred Cook for late Swift Creek Complicated Stamped ceramics on the central to lower Georgia Coast. He considered this material sufficiently unique to give it a separate series designation. The material was named after the Kelvin Grove subdivision site on St. Simons Island.

Named after a creek in Jackson Country in northeastern Alabama by Marion Heimlich based upon excavation in the Guntersville Basin on the Tennessee River.

This type is based upon William Sears' excavations at the Kolomoki site in Early County from 1948-1951. This type is essentially a form of late Swift Creek Complicated Stamped. Sears defined a few types based upon motif, but we know now that there are so many hundreds of motifs that it would be useless to give type names to them all. Name is not recommended.

Image

Named after the Lamar site, 9Bi2, by Jesse Jennings and Charles Fairbanks, although James Ford and Arthur Kelly had recognized it since 1934.

This is Robert Wauchope's term for Lamar Complicated Stamped. Use that term instead.

Image

This type is virtually identical to Lamar Complicated Stamped. It was named after Leon and Jefferson Counties in Florida as part of the historic Apalachee pottery complex. Hale Smith originally called this Jefferson Complicated Stamped, a part of his Jefferson Ware complex, but the term Leon-Jefferson has become the standard name for this type.

This type, named by William Sears, appears to be just a style variation of Swift Creek Complicated Stamped. Named after Little Kolomoki Creek at the Kolomoki site in Early County, Georgia. Swift Creek Complicated Stamped

Image

This type was defined by Robert Wauchope in the late 1940s. This name was possibly dropped, according to Joseph Caldwell, in favor of Etowah Complicated Stamped.

Image

This type was defined by Jesse Jennings and Charles Fairbanks in 1940. Named for Macon, Georgia. This is a very odd pottery type, apparently associated with some unique vessel shape and function.

This type has been named by Dave Chase for the Miner's Creek site in DeKalb County. It is the same as Swift Creek Complicated Stamped.

This is a William Sears type, based upon his excavations at Kolomoki, and is probably some variety of Swift Creek Complicated Stamped. This type was set up to classify vessels in mortuary deposits. Sears himself felt that the type should be dropped since the type deals with vessel shapes that run through several levels, while the decorative aspect varies with time. Presumably named after the Mound Field site in Wakulla, County, Florida.

Image

This type was originally defined by Jesse Jennings and Charles Fairbanks based upon sherds that had a distinctive complex style of stamping from the Napier site just east of Macon.

Image

This type is Gordon Willey's name for a variety of Swift Creek Complicated Stamped that occurred in quantity in northwestern Florida.

Image

Named after the Oemler site in Chatham County by Antonio Waring.

Image

This is similar to Lamar Complicated Stamped. Tom Lewis and Madeline Kneberg gave this name to the Lamar pottery that was in the historic Overhill Cherokee occupations in eastern Tennessee. The grit-tempered material was pulled out and named Tugalo Complicated Stamped.

This is the name that Arthur Kelly and Robert Neitzel felt should have been given to the type Savannah Complicated Stamped in the Hartwell Reservoir area and . "Archeological hindsight might more properly designate this type as Piedmont Complicated Stamped, rather than tag it with a coastal geographical designation" (Kelly and Neitzel 1961:39). No one has used this to our knowledge. This is listed here simply for completeness.

Named by Patricia Holden and revised by Bennie Keel, all from work in western North Carolina. This series has an iridescent sheen, and larger tetrapods than the similar, presumably later, Connestee series. Presumably named after the Pigeon River. Probably not a name that is very useful for Georgia.

Little known type named by Sheila Caldwell from work at Fort King George.

Defined by Patricia Holden and later revised by Roy Dickens from excavation in western North Carolina. Probably not a type that is of much use in Georgia. Presumably named after Pisgah Mountain.

A revision of the name Pisgah Complicated Stamped by Roy Dickens based upon excavations in western North Carolina. Probably not a type that is of much use in Georgia. Presumably named after Pisgah Mountain.

A revision by Roy Dickens from excavation in western North Carolina of Pisgah Complicated Stamped, a name that Dickens did not use. Probably not a type that is of much use in Georgia. Presumably named after Pisgah Mountain.

Defined by Patricia Holden and later revised by Roy Dickens from excavation in western North Carolina. Probably not a type that is of much use in Georgia. Presumably named after Pisgah Mountain.

The Qualla series was named by Brian Egloff based upon excavations by a number of people in western North Carolina, as well as northwestern South Carolina. This material is essentially Lamar series material, and that term is recommended for use in Georgia. Named after the Qualla Cherokee Reservation.

This time was originally defined by Hale Smith. Named for Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine, Florida.

Image

Defined at the Irene site, 9Ch1, in Chatham County. Named for the Savannah River and the city of Savannah by Joseph Caldwell and Antonio Waring.

This is a specific motif of Savannah Complicated Stamped. This design is not restricted to the Savannah period, however. Named for what became Savannah Complicated Stamped. Use the name Savannah Complicated Stamped instead.

This type of name was used by Robert Wauchope to described Savannah Complicated Stamped, however, this is a poor name to use because it does not allow for the division of simple stamping from complicated stamping. Same as Savannah Complicated Stamped.

A single motif of Savannah Complicated Stamped, found at Beaverdam Creek site by Brooks Hutto in the first survey of what became the Russell Reservoir project. Not a widely used type; most people would say use Savannah Complicated Stamped instead.

Frankie Snow named this material for a single design of Lamar Complicated Stamped pottery from an area in southern Georgia. The name is obviously not a typical pottery type name, and is used by Snow as a phase designation as well as a pottery type.

Image

This is a small group of rectangular designs of Swift Creek Complicated Stamped described by Gordon Willey on the northwestern Florida Gulf Coast. Named after St. Andrews Bay in northwestern Florida. The rims of the vessels define this as early in the Swift Creek period.

Named by Willey after St. Andrews Bay in northwestern Florida. Like the Early variety above, this is a Swift Creek Complicated Stamped-like stamping.

This name was by used Preston Holder for some stamped pottery he found on St. Simons Island in the 1930s. However this type was never written up description. Gordon Willey briefly describes this in his 1949 major publication.

Image

This type was originally recognized by Arthur Kelly at the Swift Creek site near Macon in the 1930s. Formally defined by Jesse Jennings and Charles Fairbanks in 1939.

Image

Named by Arthur Kelly from the Swift Creek site near Macon Georgia This name was used in this form first by Gordon Willey in 1949 The reference to Early refers to the notched or scalloped rim form, known to be early in the Swift Creek period.

Image

Named by Arthur Kelly from the Swift Creek site near Macon Georgia. This name was used in this form first by Gordon Willey in 1949. His reference to Late was based upon the folded rim form.

Swift Creek Complicated Stamped in the Oliver Basin on the Chattahoochee River as defined by Edward McMichael and James Kellar. No one has used this to our knowledge since these archaeologists.

Tugalo Complicated Stamped is the type name for Lamar Complicated Stamped at the Tugalo site, 9St1, in Stephens County. This may be a folk name among archaeologists and is not recommended for future use. Presumably defined by Arthur Kelly or, perhaps, Joseph Caldwell.

This type was only made for a brief period in time possibly only 100 years. Named by Chester DePratter after the Walthour site in Chatham County.

Defined by Miller at the Guess Site (9CO82) as part of his 1949 Allatoona Reservoir Survey. This type was never actually published, has not been used by any other person, and is not recommended for use at all. Said to be associated with Etowah Roughened and an unnamed brushed type. Have no idea why it would be named after a town over 100 miles east of the Allatoona area.

The Wilbanks Complicated Stamped pottery is unique in that the walls of the vessels are thicker, and the stamped designs are larger than those in any other Savannah-period pottery. Named after the Wilbanks site, 9Ck5, in Cherokee County by William Sears based upon his excavations there prior to the creation of Lake Allatoona.

Named after Wilmington Island on the northern Georgia Coast by Joseph Caldwell.

Robert Wauchope found site 9Ck2 in 1939. Joseph Caldwell tested it in 1939 for Wauchope and prepared a preliminary type description for Woodstock Complicated Stamped. This type description has apparently been lost. Caldwell presumably named the type after the town of Woodstock, located 1.5 miles east of the site. There is no type description for this in Caldwell 1950 - only a picture. See Woodstock Stamped also.

Named by Joseph Caldwell based upon his excavations in the Allatoona Reservoir. This is a specific, complicated, and stamped motif that he found was common in Woodstock phase sites. Use Woodstock Complicated Stamped instead.

Image

Named by Robert Wauchope as part of the Woodstock series. This is the same as Woodstock Complicated Stamped, which is the recommended name. Named after Woodstock, Georgia.