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Sand Temper

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Named by John Goggin after Alachua County, Florida, where Gainesville is located. Worth includes this as part of his Suwannee Valley series.

Named by John Goggin after Alachua County, Florida, where Gainesville is located. Worth includes this as part of his Suwannee Valley series.

Named for Allendale County, South Carolina, by James Stoltman based upon his work at the Groton Plantation.

Named by Frank Schnell, Jim Knight, and Gail Schnell after their work at the Cemochechobee site in Clay County. Special ceremonial vessels from the mound at the site. Beaker shape is the primary defining characteristic.

Defined by Gordon Willey in his 1949 report. Directly associated with Alligator Bayou Stamped. The difference between these two types is that the Alligator Bayou Stamped has rocker stamping associated with bold incised lines, while Basin Bayou Incised has just the bold lines without the rocker stamping. Named after the Basin Bayou sites, 8Wl13 and 8Wl14 in Walton County, Florida.

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Associated with the Macon Plateau site (9Bi1) at Macon, Georgia, and was defined in the 1930s as part of the massive WPA excavations there. One of several plain pottery types associated with the Macon Plateau period. Named after Bibb County.

Used, but never formall defined by Antonio Waring in several of his papers that were eventually published in 1967. Type related to types of the Gulf Coast, with connections to the west. Perhaps related to Crystal River Zoned Red.

Defined by David DeJarnette at the Childersburg site in east-central Alabama.

Defined by David DeJarnette at the Childersburg site in east-central Alabama.

This type was defined by Marion Heimlich in northeastern Alabama based upon WPA excavations in the Guntersville Reservoir on the Tennessee River. Named after the town of Columbus, Alabama, in Marshall County.

The Connestee series was named by Bennie Keel from excavations in western North Carolina, particularly the Tuckasegee site. This material is almost identical to Middle Woodland material from northern Georgia. Named after Connestee Falls?

The Connestee series was named by Bennie Keel from excavations in western North Carolina, particularly the Tuckasegee site. This material is almost identical to Middle Woodland material from northern Georgia. This type, for example, is the same as Cartersville Check Stamped. We believe that these names are better avoided in Georgia, but might be used near the North Carolina border. Named after Connestee Falls?

The Connestee series was named by Bennie Keel from excavations in western North Carolina, particularly the Tuckasegee site. This material is almost identical to Middle Woodland material from northern Georgia. We believe that these names are better avoided in Georgia, but might be used near the North Carolina border. Named after Connestee Falls?

The Connestee series was named by Bennie Keel from excavations in western North Carolina, particularly the Tuckasegee site. This material is almost identical to Middle Woodland material from northern Georgia. We believe that these names are better avoided in Georgia, but might be used near the North Carolina border. Named after Connestee Falls?

The Connestee series was named by Bennie Keel from excavations in western North Carolina, particularly the Tuckasegee site. This material is almost identical to Middle Woodland material from northern Georgia. We believe that these names are better avoided in Georgia, but might be used near the North Carolina border. Named after Connestee Falls?

The Connestee series was named by Bennie Keel from excavations in western North Carolina, particularly the Tuckasegee site. This material is almost identical to Middle Woodland material from northern Georgia. This type is the same as Cartersville Simple Stamped. We believe that these names are better avoided in Georgia, but might be used near the North Carolina border. Named after Connestee Falls?

This was defined by Wesley Hurt as part of his work in the Walter F. George Reservoir. The publication of the type description is flawed by printing (page 70 in the publication) so that the data are mixed with the description of Seale Plain. This type is not recommended for use. Presumably named after Coweta County or Coweta Creek.

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Named by Gordon Willey in 1949. This seems to be just a single motif within the broad category of Swift Creek Complicated Stamped. It does not seem necessary to name Crooked River as a separate type.

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Named by Gordon Willey in 1949. It is part of the Crystal River series, and thus presumably ancestral to the Weeden Island series. Named after the Crystal River site, 8Ci1, in Citrus County, Florida.

Named by Gorden Willey and Philip Phillips. Named after the Crystal River site, 8Ci1, in Citrus County, Florida.

Named after the Crystal River site, 8Ci1, in Citrus County, Florida by Gordon Willey in 1949.

This is Swift Creek Complicated Stamped from the Deptford site. Caldwell used the term in 1952, without much comment or formal description and DePratter continued to use this as a part of the Deptford series in his work. This type is also the same as Brewton Hill Complicated Stamped.

Original name was Franklin Plain (named after Franklin County, Florida) by Gordon Willey for Florida. Waring and Caldwell never defined the plain pottery from the Deptford site in the late 1930s. This was defined later by implication for Middle Woodland plain pottery. The term Cartersville is used for similar plain pottery in northern Georgia.

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Joseph Caldwell and Antonio Waring named this type based upon work at the Deptford site, 9Ch2 in Chatham County

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Named by Jesse Jennings and Charles Fairbanks in the SEAC Bulletin Named for the Dunlap Mound and house at Ocmulgee National Monument. Related to Long Branch Fabric Marked (limestone-tempered) in northern Alabama, and Watt's Bar Cord Marked in eastern Tennessee.

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Named by Gordon Willey for incised material from the Englewood Mound, 8So1, in Sarasota County, Florida. We doubt that this type occurs in Georgia.

Named by Gordon Willey for material from the Englewood Mound, 8So1, in Sarasota County, Florida. In Bullen (1967) the type is said to be "not a useful type, should be discarded". No one to our knowledge has used this name in Georgia, but it may occur in extreme southern Georgia. It probably is a type that can be ignored and is listed here simply for completeness.

Named after the Etowah site or valley by William Sears.

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Named after the Etowah site by Robert Wauchope.

Named after the Etowah site by Robert Wauchope.

Named after the Etowah site by Robert Wauchope.

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Named after the Etowah site by William Sears.

Named after the Etowah site or series by Arthur Kelly and Stu Neitzel based upon their excavations at the Chauga site (38Oc47) in Oconee County, South Carolina.

Named after the Etowah site by William Sears. See Etowah Red.

Named after the Etowah site (9Br1) by Arthur Kelly and Stu Neitzel based upon their excavations at the Chauga site (38Oc47) in Oconee County, South Carolina.

The Fairchilds Landing site, 9Se14, was a shell midden on the bank of the Chattahoochee River in Seminole County. This site is presently under Lake Seminole. Joseph Caldwell wrote a draft of the report of this site. Betty Smith edited it, but it has never been published to date. It is unknown if anyone has used this type name anywhere except Caldwell at the Fairchilds Landing site. He used the name for a late variety of Swift Creek that he saw there.

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John Goggin defined this type from north central Florida.

Named by Gordon Willey in 1949. We do not think anyone has used this type in Georgia. The guess is that it is the same as Deptford Check Stamped, although a bit more recent. Presumably this would have been an ancestor to Wakulla Check Stamped. Named after Gulf County, Florida. Name was supposedly discarded by the Southeastern Archaeological Conference in 1951 or 1953 according to Bullen (1966:11).

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This type was named by Gordon Willey. This type is part of the Weeden Island pottery series. Named after the Indian Pass Point site, 8Gu1, in Gulf County, Florida.

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This type was named by Gordon Willey in 1949. It also is part of the Weeden Island Series.

Named by Joseph Caldwell in his master's thesis after WPA excavations at Fort King George at Darien in McIntosh County near the mouth of the Altamaha River. Joseph Caldwell and his wife, Sheila Kelly Caldwell, eventually renamed this type as Altamaha Red Filmed presumably because this was an Indian pottery that definitely preceded the constructions of the Fort. This term should probably not be used. Related to Mission Red Film and Kasita Red Filmed.

Named after a creek in Jackson Country in northeastern Alabama by Marion Heimlich based upon excavation in the Guntersville Basin on the Tennessee River.

This type is based upon William Sears' excavations at the Kolomoki site in Early County from 1948-1951. This type is essentially a form of late Swift Creek Complicated Stamped. Sears defined a few types based upon motif, but we know now that there are so many hundreds of motifs that it would be useless to give type names to them all. Name is not recommended.

This type is based upon William Sears' excavations at the Kolomoki site in Early County from 1948-1951. This type is the plain pottery of Swift Creek and the name Swift Creek Plain should be used instead. Named for the Kolomoki Mound site.

Named by John Griffin after the Lake Jackson site in the northern city limits of Tallahassee, Florida.

Named by Marion Heimlich based upon work in the Guntersville Basin on the Tennessee River in northeastern Alabama. Not certain of the origin of the name.

This type, named by William Sears, appears to be just a style variation of Swift Creek Complicated Stamped. Named after Little Kolomoki Creek at the Kolomoki site in Early County, Georgia. Swift Creek Complicated Stamped

This type is the same as Deptford Check Stamped. Named by Steve Wimberly after the McLeod Estate site in Clarke County, Alabama. This type was included on the Georgia list by Caldwell in 1969 for unknown reasons.

This type is the same as Deptford Linear Check Stamped. Named by Steve Wimberly after the McLeod Estate site in Clarke County, Alabama. This type was included on the Georgia list by Caldwell in 1969 for unknown reasons.

This type is the same as Deptford Linear Check Stamped. Named by Steve Wimberly after the McLeod Estate site in Clarke County, Alabama. This type was included on the Georgia list by Caldwell in 1969 for unknown reasons.

Named by Steve Wimberly after the McLeod Estate site in Clarke County, Alabama. This type was included on the Georgia list by Caldwell in 1969 for unknown reasons.

This type is the same as Kasita Red Filmed. The name Mission Red Filmed was first given by Hale Smith for the Leon-Jefferson Complex in the Tallahassee area because it is associated with the Apalachee Indians who became converts under the Spanish missions. The vessels may be copy ware of Spanish vessels. Gordon Willey used the type name Kasita Red Filmed for similar material up the Chattahoochee River at the Fall Line.

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This type was simple stamped pottery first found in Putnam County at the Vining site by Arthur Kelly, and named Vining Simple Stamped by him. Then, in the Macon area, the Mossy Oak site was excavated, revealing Lamar materials on top of this Vining material. The type was renamed Mossy Oak based upon the new excavations. In the late 1930s excavations took place at the Deptford site (9Ch2) near Savannah, and much simple stamped pottery was found there. It was correctly concluded that this was Early to Middle Woodland simple stamping. Researchers jumped to the false conclusion that Mossy Oak in the central Georgia area was also an Early to Middle Woodland type. This misconception persisted until the 1980s, but we now know that this type is indeed a Late Woodland type, and that it is not the same as the simple stamping of Deptford. Because of the confusion of the name Mossy Oak, the name Vining Simple Stamped is now preferred.

This type was originally defined by Gordon Willey in 1949. Named after the Mound Field site, 8Wa8, in Wakulla, County, Florida

Defined by Frank Schnell, Jim Knight, and Gail Schnell based upon their work at the Cemochechobee site in Clay County. This pottery is defined by its fine paste and distinctive color.

Defined by Frank Schnell, Jim Knight, and Gail Schnell based upon their work at the Cemochechobee site in Clay County. This pottery is defined by its fine paste and distinctive color.

Frankie Snow set up these three types in 1977. They are geographically distinct areas that overlap to some degree. The variation is in terms of proportions of rim treatments in the different area.

Frankie Snow set up these three types in 1977. They are geographically distinct areas that overlap to some degree. The variation is in terms of proportions of rim treatments in the different area.

Frankie Snow set up these three types in 1977. They are geographically distinct areas that overlap to some degree. The variation is in terms of proportions of rim treatments in the different area.

Named by Robert Wauchope for material upstream from Macon. No one else has really used this type and it is not recommended.

This is an early variety of Deptford Check Stamped according to Chester DePratter. Named after the Oemler site in Chatham County.

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Named after the Oemler site in Chatham County by Antonio Waring.

This was used by Joseph Caldwell in his Master's thesis, but has not been used since. Named after the Oemler site in Chatham County.

Similar, but earlier than, Weeden Island Zoned Red. Named by Gordon Willey after the Pierce site, 8Fr14, in Franklin County, Florida.

Named by Patricia Holden and revised by Bennie Keel, all from work in western North Carolina. This series has an iridescent sheen, and larger tetrapods than the similar, and presumably later, Connestee Brushed. Presumably named after the Pigeon River. Probably not a name that is very useful for Georgia.

Named by Patricia Holden and revised by Bennie Keel, all from work in western North Carolina. This series has an iridescent sheen, and larger tetrapods than the similar, and presumably later, Connestee series. Presumably named after the Pigeon River. Probably not a name that is very useful for Georgia.

Named by Patricia Holden and revised by Bennie Keel, all from work in western North Carolina. This series has an iridescent sheen, and larger tetrapods than the similar, presumably later, Connestee series. Presumably named after the Pigeon River. Probably not a name that is very useful for Georgia.

Named by Patricia Holden and revised by Bennie Keel, all from work in western North Carolina. This series has an iridescent sheen, and larger tetrapods than the similar, presumably later, Connestee series. Presumably named after the Pigeon River. Probably not a name that is very useful for Georgia.

Named by Patricia Holden and revised by Bennie Keel, all from work in western North Carolina. This series has an iridescent sheen, and larger tetrapods than the similar, presumably later, Connestee series. Presumably named after the Pigeon River. Probably not a name that is very useful for Georgia.

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This type is related to Fort Walton Incised. Named by Gordon Willey for Pinellas County, Florida.

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Named by Gordon Willey for Pinellas County, Florida.

Not in Willey 1949. We are uncertain where or if this was ever used. Named for Pinellas County, Florida.

This type was originally defined by Gordon Willey. Named for the Safety Harbor site, 8Pi2, in Pinellas County, Florida.

This type was originally defined by John Goggin. Named for Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine, Florida.

This type was originally defined by John Goggin. Named for Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine, Florida.

Named by Gordon Willey from work in southeast Florida for Sanibel Island. This type was listed in the 1969 Georgia list developed under Joseph Caldwell, but it seems very unlikely that this type has ever been found in Georgia.

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This is a small group of rectangular designs of Swift Creek Complicated Stamped described by Gordon Willey on the northwestern Florida Gulf Coast. Named after St. Andrews Bay in northwestern Florida. The rims of the vessels define this as early in the Swift Creek period.

Originally named the Early series by Patricia Holden, this was renamed as the Swannanoa series by Keel. This is the earliest Woodland pottery series of western North Carolina. Named after the Swannanoa River. Probably is not a good name for use in Georgia.

Originally named the Early series by Patricia Holden, this was renamed as the Swannanoa series by Keel. This is the earliest Woodland pottery series of western North Carolina. Named after the Swannanoa River. Probably is not a good name for use in Georgia.

Originally named the Early series by Patricia Holden, this was renamed as the Swannanoa series by Keel. This is the earliest Woodland pottery series of western North Carolina. Named after the Swannanoa River. Probably is not a good name for use in Georgia.

Originally named the Early series by Patricia Holden, this was renamed as the Swannanoa series by Keel. This is the earliest Woodland pottery series of western North Carolina. Named after the Swannanoa River. Probably is not a good name for use in Georgia.

Originally named the Early series by Patricia Holden, this was renamed as the Swannanoa series by Keel. This is the earliest Woodland pottery series of western North Carolina. Named after the Swannanoa River. Probably is not a good name for use in Georgia.

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Named by Arthur Kelly from the Swift Creek site near Macon Georgia This name was used in this form first by Gordon Willey in 1949 The reference to Early refers to the notched or scalloped rim form, known to be early in the Swift Creek period.

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Named by Arthur Kelly from the Swift Creek site near Macon Georgia. This name was used in this form first by Gordon Willey in 1949. His reference to Late was based upon the folded rim form.

Robert Wauchope defined this odd type. Named after Towaliga River in Monroe County.

Named after the Towaliga River. Robert Wauchope defined this type of material in Monroe County.

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This type was originally named by Gordon Willey for the Florida Gulf Coast. Named after the Tucker site, 8Fr4, in Franklin County, Florida.

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Originally used by Arthur Kelly in late 1930s for material from the Vining site north of Eatonton in the Georgia Piedmont. The type was mistakenly thought to be Early Woodland in date for many years, and was renamed Mossy Oak Simple Stamped in the 1940s. Since the discovery in the 1980s that this material is in fact Late Woodland in date, the term Vining has been resurrected to use for this Late Woodland simple stamped pottery.

Presumably named by Tom Lewis and Madeline Kneberg after Watts Bar, Tennessee, in Roane County.

Name used informally by Robert Wauchope. Never used again, perhaps for good reason. Not recommended for Georgia or Florida.

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This type was originally defined by Gordon Willey for the Florida Gulf Coast. Named after the Weeden Island site, 8Pi1, in Pinellas County, Florida.

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This type was originally defined by Gordon Willey for the Florida Gulf Coast. Named after the Weeden Island site, 8Pi1, in Pinellas County, Florida.

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This type was originally defined by Gordon Willey for the Florida Gulf Coast. Named after the Weeden Island site, 8Pi1, in Pinellas County, Florida.

This type was defined by William Sears based upon his excavations at Kolomoki.

This type was originally defined by Gordon Willey for the Florida Gulf Coast. Named after the Weeden Island site, 8Pi1 in Pinellas County, Florida.

This type was originally defined by Gordon Willey for the Florida Gulf Coast. Willey states that this pottery is similar to other cord marked pottery in the Southeast, and that this type should be merged in with some of the other cord marked pottery of the interior. The Early designation is based upon the notched or scalloped rim forms.

This type was originally defined by Gordon Willey for the Florida Gulf Coast. Willey states that this pottery is similar to other cord marked pottery in the southeast and that this type should be merged in with some of the other cord marked pottery of the interior. The Late designation is based upon the folded rims.

This type is somewhat problematic because northwestern Georgia is also the geographic region of Etowah Red Filmed and Savannah Red Filmed. These three types - Etowah, Savannah, and Wilbanks - are too similar to be reliably sorted out of context. Savannah Red Filmed is the most frequently used type name to describe red filming of the Savannah period throughout the state of Georgia. Named after the Wilbanks site, 9Ck5, in Cherokee County by William Sears based upon his excavations there prior to the creation of Lake Allatoona.