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Grit Temper

This type was defined at Fort King George at Darien, Georgia by Sheila Kelly Caldwell in the 1950s. Named after the Altamaha River and based upon King George Check Stamped with the blessings of her husband, archaeologist Joseph Caldwell, who dug at the site in the late 1930s and who named the King George series. Sheila Caldwell also toyed with the name Pine Harbor Check Stamped for this material.

Sheila Kelly initially called this type Creighton Island Complicated Stamped.

Named after the Altamaha River. This was originally King George Malleated, was changed to Altamaha Malleated, and then to Altamaha Complicated Stamped. Also see Altamaha Line Blocked for comparison. By 1969 it was clear to Caldwell that the design was made by successive application of a simple stamped paddle. He used this term at that time for the type, and this actually makes more sense than the Line Block name, although the former is quite common in the literature now. We now recognize that Altamaha Cross Simple Stamped and Altamaha Line Blocked are two distinct types.

See King George Incised. Sheila Caldwell based this on Joseph Caldwell's earlier work at Fort King George, when she was conducting (unpublished) excavations there in the early 1950s. She initially named another incised type, Darien Incised, but apparently intended to collapse this into her Altamaha Incised. See McIntosh Incised also.

Named after the Altamaha River. The type name was originally called King George Malleated in Joseph Caldwell's Master's thesis, but was changed to the present name by his wife Sheila based upon her excavations at Fort King George in the early 1950s. Once thought to be a series of cross simple stamp designs. We now recognize that Altamaha Cross Simple Stamped and Altamaha Line Blocked are two distinct types.

Sheila Caldwell apparently intended to split this into two types for a gritty plain and a temperless plain in her unpublished data on her excavations at Fort King George. She initially toyed with the names, Creighton Island Plain and Belleville Plain. See King George Plain.

Defined by David Chase. Named after the Averett site.

Defined by David Chase. Named after the Averett site.

Defined by David Chase. Named after the Averett site.

Eugene Waddell defined this as a young amateur in South Carolina. Chester DePratter reports that sites with this usually have only this type of pottery on them, and reports one such site near Savannah. Material is very similar to Thom's Creek Punctated and Refuge Punctated. Named after Awendaw Creek or the town of Awendaw in Charleston County, northeast of Charleston, South Carolina.

An early name considered by Sheila Caldwell for what eventually became Altamaha Plain.

Defined by Sears at Kolomoki, and he was perhaps the only person to use this name. Most people considered it Deptford Check Stamped, and by the 1960s, the name was no longer used at all. This name might make some sense in a type-variety system to speak of the Kolomoki variant of Deptford as Blakely, but we don't know if it can be separately identified. Named after the town of Blakely, Georgia.

Named by Joseph Caldwell based upon work in the Allatoona Reservoir. Historic Cherokee pottery style.

Used, but never formall defined by Antonio Waring in several of his papers that were eventually published in 1967. Type related to types of the Gulf Coast, with connections to the west. Perhaps related to Crystal River Zoned Red.

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Useless name created by Charles Fairbanks in the mid 1950s for certain Macon Plateau period sherds found at the Brown's Mount site, 9Bi5, east of Macon. Brown's Mount Plain is essentially Bibb Plain in the form of little owl effigies that are perched on the lips of Bibb Plain bowls. The excavators found several of these bowls at the Brown's Mount site in a pure Macon Plateau context in the 1930s and Fairbanks thought they were noteworthy enough that he should call them Brown's Mount to recognize this characteristic. Has little reason to exist in our judgment. Use Bibb Plain as a type name instead.

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Defined by Gordon Willey in 1949. Named after the Carrabelle site, 8Fr2, in Franklin County, Florida.

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This type was defined by Gordon Willey in 1949. Named after the Carrabelle site, 8Fr2, in Franklin County, Florida.

Defined by Chester DePratter from analysis of sherds from Chatham County WPA excavations.  Named for Chatham County, where Savannah is located.  Type is closely related to Deptford Cord Marked and similar to the later Savannah Fine Cord Marked.

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This type was defined by Ripley Bullen in the 1950s. This type is the standard for historic period brushed pottery on the Chattahoochee River. Walnut Roughened in the Macon area is the same thing, only on shell-tempered pottery.

Jim Knight says that this is the equivalent to Bullen's 1950 Chattahoochee Brushed. Not sure why the name was changed.

Named after Chestua Creek in Monroe county, Tennessee. It supposedly is a historic Cherokee ware according to the Bettye Broyles note in 1967. We certainly do not recommend its use in Georgia at the present time.

Named after the lake on the Savannah River by Carl Miller. This type is not much known, but presumably it represents the necks of Savannah period jars. This type is essentially unknown and probably should not be reused.

Named by Richard Polhemus and James Polhemus, Jr. A very distinctive early Mississippian type in upper eastern Tennessee. Probably a name that should not be used in Georgia. Roy Dickens equated it with Pisgah Complicated Stamped.

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Recognized by Harold Huscher at the Cool Branch site in Quitman County, Georgia, and defined by William Sears based upon excavation at the Tierra Verde site in Florida. See discussion by Frank Schnell, Jim Knight, and Gail Schnell.

A name used for a time by Sheila Caldwell before she adopted the name Altamaha Complicated Stamped. Named after Creighton Island.

A name used for a time by Sheila Caldwell before she adopted the name Altamaha Plain. Named after Creighton Island.

Named by Gordon Willey in 1949. This seems to be just a single motif within the broad category of Swift Creek. He implies that it is later, as part of his Weeden Island period, but the only difference noted from the Early Variety is the coarser paste and finish. Whether this distinction is true of not in Georgia (or Florida) is probably an open question.

Named by Sheila Kelly for a time for an incised pottery that she eventually included/renamed as Altamaha Incised.

Arthur Kelly's original (ca.1935) name for what became known as Napier Complicated Stamped. One of the first pottery types in Georgia, this name is now completely obsolete.

Joseph Caldwell and Antonio Waring named this type base upon the 1930's WPA work at the Deptford site, 9Ch2,in Chatham County on the Georgia Coast. Deptford Bold Check Stamped and Deptford Check Stamped are the same type. By the 1960s Wauchope was using the name Deptford Check Stamped for the non-linear check stamped pottery.

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Joseph Caldwell and Antonio Waring named this type base upon the 1930's WPA work at the Deptford Site, 9Ch2, in Chatham County on the Georgia Coast. Deptford Bold Check Stamped and Deptford Check Stamped are the same type. By the 1960's Wauchope was using the name Deptford Check Stamped for the non-linear check stamped pottery.

This is Swift Creek Complicated Stamped from the Deptford site. Caldwell used the term in 1952, without much comment or formal description and DePratter continued to use this as a part of the Deptford series in his work. This type is also the same as Brewton Hill Complicated Stamped.

Goggin referred to this in 1952. Also see comments in Deptford Heavy Cord Marked description. DePratter believes this is simply Chatham County Cord Marked found with Deptford Check Stamped. Savannah Fine Cord Marked is likely related, but at a later time period.

Formerly Wacissa Cross Simple Stamped. No formal type description is given by David Phelps, who defined it. This is related to Refuge Simple Stamped.

This was used by Caldwell, but was not formally defined. See and use Deptford Cord Marked instead.

Recognized recently from a reanalysis of sherds from the Deptford site conducted at the University of Georgia.

Named after the Etowah site (9Br1) by Robert Wauchope.

Robert Wauchope believed that this type was an unintentional decoration. He believed that the pots received these impressions while being hung in nets to dry. The evidence for this view is that some of the cord marked vessels were over-smeared with clay to hide the cord impressions and that cord impressions are found over other Etowah designs.

Named after the Etowah site by Robert Wauchope.

Named after the Etowah site by Robert Wauchope.

Joseph Caldwell defined this in his Allatoona Reservoir report based upon his excavations there in the late 1940s. This is a specific complicated stamped motif that is quite common during the Etowah period.

Named by John Worth from excavations at the Fig Springs site in northern Florida. Part of Worth's Suwannee Valley series.

Named by John Worth based upon excavation at Fig Springs site in northern Florida. Part of Worth's Suwannee Valley series.

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This type was named by Gordon Willey. This pottery is related to Lamar Bold Incised and Pinellas Incised, but the designs are different. Named after Fort Walton Beach, on the Florida Gulf Coast.

This type was named by Joseph Caldwell for material from the Allatoona Reservoir. Named after old Galt's Ferry over the Etowah River in Cherokee County. It is associated with late Cherokee Indian occupation of northwestern Georgia.

This type was named by Joseph Caldwell for material from the Allatoona Reservoir. Named after old Galt's Ferry over the Etowah River in Cherokee County.

This was named by Joseph Caldwell based upon his excavation in the Allatoona Reservoir. This plain pottery was a part of the historic Cherokee component from northwestern Georgia.

This was named by Joseph Caldwell based upon his excavation in the Allatoona Reservoir. This rough plain pottery was a part of the historic Cherokee component from northwestern Georgia.

This type was named by Joseph Caldwell for material in the Allatoona Reservoir. Named after old Galt's Ferry over the Etowah River in Cherokee County.

Named by John Worth from excavations at the Fig Springs site in north-central Florida. Related to Tucker Ridge Pinched, but the pinching is not in ridges for Grassy Hole Pinched. Part of the Suwannee Valley series as defined by Worth.

Named after the Hares Landing site in Lake Seminole by Joseph Caldwell. Apparently named only in his 1969 ceramics seminar.

Named by Frank Schnell, Jim Knight, and Gail Schnell for Lamar Plain pottery from the Cemochechobee site (9Cy62) in Clay County on the lower Chattahoochee River. This is defined mainly by the lip treatment.

Named after the Irene site, 9Ch1, in the northern portion of Savannah excavated in the late 1930s. Related to Lamar Plain.

Named after the Irene site, 9Ch1, in the northern portion of Savannah excavated in the late 1930s. This obvious name was never defined as such in the 1930s, but Chester DePratter formally defined in years later. Related to Lamar Complicated Stamped.

Named after the Irene site, 9Ch1, in the northern portion of Savannah excavated in the late 1930s. Never formally defined, but recognized and discussed by Caldwell in his 1969 class. Related to the Lamar series.

This type was named by Joseph Caldwell and Antonio Waring after the Irene site, 9Ch1, excavated in Savannah in the late 1930s. This type name is no longer recommended, use Irene Complicated Stamped instead.

Named after the Irene site, 9Ch1, in the northern portion of Savannah excavated in the late 1930s. Apparently never discussed until the 1969 seminar. If this exits, it clearly is related to Savannah Fine Cord Marked.

This is essentially the same as Lamar Bold Incised. Named after the Irene site, 9Ch1, in the northern portion of Savannah excavated in the late 1930s.

Named after the Irene site, 9Ch1, in the northern portion of Savannah excavated in the late 1930s.

This name was used briefly by Hale Smith as the name for historic Apalachee Indian complicated stamped pottery. It was named by Hale Smith from his excavations around Tallahassee, Florida. It was named after Jefferson County, Florida.

This unusual type includes several historic Apalachee Indian ceramic types, but primarily is the same as what is now called Leon-Jefferson Complicated Stamped. It was named by Hale Smith from his excavations around Tallahassee, Florida. It was named after Jefferson County, Florida.

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Named for the Creek Indian town of Kasita near Columbus, Georgia, by Jesse Jennings and Charles Fairbanks. Also see Mission Red Filmed.

This type was named by Joseph Caldwell in the Allatoona area. Named for Kellogg Creek in Cherokee County. Also called Kellogg Cord Wrapped Stick Decorated.

This type was named by Joseph Caldwell in the Allatoona area. Named for Kellogg Creek in Cherokee County. The name apparently dropped in favor of Dunlap Fabric Marked, according to Caldwell.

Named by Joseph Caldwell in his master's thesis after WPA excavations at Fort King George at Darien in McIntosh County near the mouth of the Altamaha River. Joseph Caldwell and his wife, Sheila Kelly Caldwell, eventually renamed this type as Altamaha Check Stamped presumably because this was an Indian pottery that definitely preceded the constructions of the Fort. This term should probably not be used.

Named by Joseph Caldwell in his master's thesis after WPA excavations at Fort King George at Darien in McIntosh County near the mouth of the Altamaha River. Joseph Caldwell and his wife, Sheila Kelly Caldwell, eventually renamed this type as Altamaha Line Blocked presumably because this was an Indian pottery that definitely preceded the constructions of the Fort. This term should probably not be used.

Named by Joseph Caldwell in his master's thesis after WPA excavations at Fort King George at Darien in McIntosh County near the mouth of the Altamaha River. Joseph Caldwell and his wife, Sheila Kelly Caldwell, eventually renamed this type as Altamaha Plain presumably because this was an Indian pottery that definitely preceded the constructions of the Fort. This term should probably not be used.

Named after a creek in Jackson Country in northeastern Alabama by Marion Heimlich based upon excavation in the Guntersville Basin on the Tennessee River.

Frank Schnell, Jim Knight, and Gail Schnell created this catch-all category for three different varieties of pottery. These include Cool Branch Incised, Lake Jackson Incised, and Lake Jackson Plain. This was done based upon their work at the Cemochechobee site in Clay County. The reader is referred to in their detailed discussion. Named after the famous Lake Jackson site in the northern city limits of Tallahassee, Florida.

This was defined by William Sears based upon excavations at the Tierra Verde site in Florida. Frank Schnell, Jim Knight, and Gail Schnell have included this in their Lake Jackson Decorated type. Named for the famous Lake Jackson site in the northern city limits of Tallahassee, Florida

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This type is named after the Lamar site, 9Bi2, at Macon. Jesse Jennings and Charles Fairbanks formally defined this type, although James Ford and Arthur Kelly had recognized in 1934 from their excavations at Lamar.

David Hally defined this from the Potts Tract site (9Mu103) in Murray County in northwestern Georgia.

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Named after the Lamar site, 9Bi2, by Jesse Jennings and Charles Fairbanks, although James Ford and Arthur Kelly had recognized it since 1934.

This type has apparently never been defined per se, but is often used in conversation. It has frequently been used as the equivalent of Lamar Bold Incised, which is the preferred name, and it is commonly seen in the literature.

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This has never been formally defined as far as we know, but it is commonly used by archaeologists.

This type, strangely, was never formally defined, as best we can determine, although Caldwell almost does so in his 1953 description of the Rembert site. Robert Wauchope used the name Lamar Plain Smoothed, presumably the same thing, but almost no one has used it since him.

Defined by Joseph Caldwell in the Allatoona Reservoir. Some researchers have used this type. This presumably is unsorted badly over stamped complicated stamped pottery. See Lamar Coarse Plain also.

This is Robert Wauchope's term for Lamar Complicated Stamped. Use that term instead.

Gordon Willey excavated at the Lawson Field site located on Fort Benning near Columbus, Georgia, in 1939. It is uncertain if this is a useful type. A better type name for this sort of pottery might be Ocmulgee Fields Incised. Lawson Field is the name for the airport landing strip at Fort Benning.

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Hale Smith named this type after Leon County, Florida in 1948 as part of his Leon-Jefferson Complex in northwestern Florida. This type is associated with the historic Apalachee Indians of the Mission period.

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This type is virtually identical to Lamar Complicated Stamped. It was named after Leon and Jefferson Counties in Florida as part of the historic Apalachee pottery complex. Hale Smith originally called this Jefferson Complicated Stamped, a part of his Jefferson Ware complex, but the term Leon-Jefferson has become the standard name for this type.

Defined by John Goggin and then Jerald Milanich. This may derive from Carrabelle Punctated. John Worth includes this as part of his Suwannee Valley series. Presumably named after Lochloosa Lake near Gainesville, Florida.

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This type was defined by Robert Wauchope in the late 1940s. This name was possibly dropped, according to Joseph Caldwell, in favor of Etowah Complicated Stamped.

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This type was defined by Jesse Jennings and Charles Fairbanks in 1940. Named for Macon, Georgia. This is a very odd pottery type, apparently associated with some unique vessel shape and function.

This type was defined by Lewis Larson. Named after McIntosh County on the Georgia Coast. See also Altamaha Incised

A name listed by Broyles that we have been unable to verify that anyone actually ever used. See McLeod Check Stamped.

This type has been named by Dave Chase for the Miner's Creek site in DeKalb County. It is the same as Swift Creek Complicated Stamped.

Named after Morgan County, Georgia. First found by Mark Williams at the Joe Bell site, 9Mg28, at the junction of the Apalachee and Oconee Rivers, now under Lake Oconee. The formal recognition of this type was by Marvin Smith at the Dyar site, 9Ge5, now also in Lake Oconee.

Named developed by Robert Wauchope and used only by him. The name is not recommended. Named after the Mossy Oak site just east of Macon on the banks of the Ocmulgee River.

This is a William Sears type, based upon his excavations at Kolomoki, and is probably some variety of Swift Creek Complicated Stamped. This type was set up to classify vessels in mortuary deposits. Sears himself felt that the type should be dropped since the type deals with vessel shapes that run through several levels, while the decorative aspect varies with time. Presumably named after the Mound Field site in Wakulla, County, Florida.

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This type was originally defined by Jesse Jennings and Charles Fairbanks based upon sherds that had a distinctive complex style of stamping from the Napier site just east of Macon.

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This type is Gordon Willey's name for a variety of Swift Creek Complicated Stamped that occurred in quantity in northwestern Florida.

Charles Fairbanks accidentally named this type without the word "Fields" in 1956. See Ocmulgee Fields Check Stamped, the current recommended name.

Charles Fairbanks defined this type at Ocmulgee National Monument. This type is assumed to be the equivalent of Leon Check Stamped. This type was defined in conjunction with the discovery of the Trading Post at Ocmulgee. It was later discovered that this type is originally from Alabama and that people who were making this came over to the Macon area. This type was originally defined as Ocmulgee Check Stamped in Griffin 1953 by Charles Fairbanks. Joseph Caldwell redefined this with the word "Fields" included for consistency, and this is the recommended form.

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Named by Jesse Jennings and Charles Fairbanks. Fairbanks thought that this type evolved directly out of Lamar Bold Incised. Related to Aucilla Incised. Named after Ocmulgee Fields at Ocmulgee National Monument in Macon.

This is the plain pottery associated with the other Ocmulgee Fields types. Named by Charles Fairbanks.

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First recognized at the Joe Bell site (9Mg28), by Mark Williams and then seen throughout the Piedmont part of the Oconee Valley. Never formally named until now.

Used by Arthur Kelly and Charles Fairbanks orally, based upon their separate work at 9Bl16 in Baldwin County just south of Milledgeville. Use the name Ocmulgee Fields Incised instead.

David Chase defined this type from his work at the Miner's Creek site in DeKalb County. This is an enigmatic and elusive type found at only a handful of Middle Woodland sites, either big Hopewellian centers (including Ohio, Tennessee, Indiana, Georgia, and Florida) as well as at a group of Swift Creek sites in the Atlanta area.

This is the name that Arthur Kelly and Robert Neitzel felt should have been given to the type Savannah Complicated Stamped in the Hartwell Reservoir area and . "Archeological hindsight might more properly designate this type as Piedmont Complicated Stamped, rather than tag it with a coastal geographical designation" (Kelly and Neitzel 1961:39). No one has used this to our knowledge. This is listed here simply for completeness.

A name used briefly by Sheila Caldwell for what eventually became Altamaha Check Stamped.

Little known type named by Sheila Caldwell from work at Fort King George.

Little known type named by Sheila Caldwell from work at Fort King George.

Defined by Patricia Holden and later revised by Roy Dickens from excavation in western North Carolina. Probably not a type that is of much use in Georgia. Presumably named after Pisgah Mountain.

A revision of the name Pisgah Complicated Stamped by Roy Dickens based upon excavations in western North Carolina. Probably not a type that is of much use in Georgia. Presumably named after Pisgah Mountain.

Defined by Patricia Holden and later revised by Roy Dickens from excavation in western North Carolina. Probably not a type that is of much use in Georgia. Presumably named after Pisgah Mountain.

A revision by Roy Dickens from excavation in western North Carolina of Pisgah Complicated Stamped, a name that Dickens did not use. Probably not a type that is of much use in Georgia. Presumably named after Pisgah Mountain.

Defined by Patricia Holden and later revised by Roy Dickens from excavation in western North Carolina. Probably not a type that is of much use in Georgia. Presumably named after Pisgah Mountain.

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Named by Gordon Willey for the Point Washington site excavated by Clarence B. Moore in Washington County, Florida.

Named by John Goggin from north-central Florida, and refined by Jerald Milanich and John Worth. Presumably related to West Florida Cord Marked, the Ocmulgee Cord Marked types of Frankie Snow, and even Wilmington Heavy Cord Marked on the Georgia Coast. This broad similarity may reflect a movement of people from south-central Georgia to north-central Florida according to Milanich. This is a part of what John Worth (n.d.) calls the Suwannee Valley Series.

The Qualla series was named by Brian Egloff based upon excavations by a number of people in western North Carolina, as well as northwestern South Carolina. This material is essentially Lamar series material, and that term is recommended for use in Georgia. Named after the Qualla Cherokee Reservation.

The Qualla series was named by Brian Egloff based upon excavations by a number of people in western North Carolina, as well as northwestern South Carolina. This material is essentially Lamar series material, and that term is recommended for use in Georgia. Named after the Qualla Cherokee Reservation.

The Qualla series was named by Brian Egloff based upon excavations by a number of people in western North Carolina, as well as northwestern South Carolina. This material is essentially Lamar series material, and that term is recommended for use in Georgia. Named after the Qualla Cherokee Reservation.

The Qualla series was named by Brian Egloff based upon excavations by a number of people in western North Carolina, as well as northwestern South Carolina. This material is essentially Lamar series material, and that term is recommended for use in Georgia. Named after the Qualla Cherokee Reservation.

The Qualla series was named by Brian Egloff based upon excavations by a number of people in western North Carolina, as well as northwestern South Carolina. This material is essentially Lamar series material, and that term is recommended for use in Georgia. Named after the Qualla Cherokee Reservation.

The Qualla series was named by Brian Egloff based upon excavations by a number of people in western North Carolina, as well as northern South Carolina. This material is essentially Lamar series material, and that term is recommended for use in Georgia. Named after the Qualla Cherokee Reservation.

The Qualla series was named by Brian Egloff based upon excavations by a number of people in western North Carolina, as well as northern South Carolina. This material is essentially Lamar series material, and that term is recommended for use in Georgia. Named after the Qualla Cherokee Reservation.

The Qualla series was named by Brian Egloff based upon excavations by a number of people in western North Carolina, as well as northern South Carolina. This material is essentially Lamar series material, and that term is recommended for use in Georgia. Named after the Qualla Cherokee Reservation.

Defined by Marion Heimlich for pottery found in the Guntersville Basin along the Tennessee River in northeastern Alabama. This type has been found at both the Little Egypt site by David Hally and at the Etowah site by Adam King.

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Named for the Savannah River and the city of Savannah by Joseph Caldwell and Antonio Waring.

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Named for the Savannah River and the city of Savannah by Joseph Caldwell and Antonio Waring.

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Defined at the Irene site, 9Ch1, in Chatham County. Named for the Savannah River and the city of Savannah by Joseph Caldwell and Antonio Waring.

A single motif of Savannah Complicated Stamped, found at Beaverdam Creek site by Brooks Hutto in the first survey of what became the Russell Reservoir project. Not a widely used type; most people would say use Savannah Complicated Stamped instead.

Frankie Snow named this material for a single design of Lamar Complicated Stamped pottery from an area in southern Georgia. The name is obviously not a typical pottery type name, and is used by Snow as a phase designation as well as a pottery type.

This name was by used Preston Holder for some stamped pottery he found on St. Simons Island in the 1930s. However this type was never written up description. Gordon Willey briefly describes this in his 1949 major publication.

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This type was originally recognized by Arthur Kelly at the Swift Creek site near Macon in the 1930s. Formally defined by Jesse Jennings and Charles Fairbanks in 1939.

Tugalo Complicated Stamped is the type name for Lamar Complicated Stamped at the Tugalo site, 9St1, in Stephens County. This may be a folk name among archaeologists and is not recommended for future use. Presumably defined by Arthur Kelly or, perhaps, Joseph Caldwell.

This is the type name for Lamar Bold Incised pottery at the Tugalo site, 9St1, in Stephens County. This may be a folk name among archaeologists and is not recommended for future use. We could not find it in print other than in Broyles. Presumably defined by Arthur Kelly or, perhaps, Joseph Caldwell.

Presumably defined by Arthur Kelly or, perhaps, Joseph Caldwell. The name may have been used, but we have not found it in print other than in Broyles

The Wilbanks Complicated Stamped pottery is unique in that the walls of the vessels are thicker, and the stamped designs are larger than those in any other Savannah-period pottery. Named after the Wilbanks site, 9Ck5, in Cherokee County by William Sears based upon his excavations there prior to the creation of Lake Allatoona.

This was named by Joseph Caldwell based upon his excavations in the Allatoona Reservoir. This is presumably the same as Wilbanks Red Filmed, which is the preferred name.

Named after the Wilbanks site, 9Ck5, in Cherokee County by William Sears based upon his excavations there prior to the creation of Lake Allatoona.

Dave Chase toyed with using this name for incised pottery found at the Walker Street site south of Columbus, but settled for X Incised instead, thus accidentally putting both names in the literature at the same time. Presumably named after the Woolfolk mound.

Dave Chase toyed with using this name for this plain pottery found at the Walker Street site south of Columbus, but settled for X Plain instead, thus accidentally putting both names in the literature at the same time. Presumably named after the Woolfolk mound.

Dave Chase used this name for this incised pottery found at the Walker Street site south of Columbus.

Dave Chase used this name for plain pottery found at the Walker Street site south of Columbus.